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Uniontown 
Connellsville 
(724) 320-2447

January 2020

Monday, 27 January 2020 00:00

Do I Have Poor Circulation?

Poor circulation is a common ailment that many people suffer from. It can occur as a result of diabetes, smoking tobacco products, or being overweight. The symptoms that are commonly associated with poor circulation can include swelling, a tingling or burning sensation in the feet, and there may be pain and discomfort. Research has indicated it may be beneficial to eat a diet that consists of healthy foods, and wearing compression stockings may help existing swelling. If you have symptoms of poor circulation, it is advised that you are under the care of a podiatrist who can properly treat this condition.

While poor circulation itself isn’t a condition; it is a symptom of another underlying health condition you may have. If you have any concerns with poor circulation in your feet contact Dr. Arnold Tarpley, Jr. of Tarpley Foot and Ankle Center. Dr. Tarpley will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Poor Circulation in the Feet

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) can potentially lead to poor circulation in the lower extremities. PAD is a condition that causes the blood vessels and arteries to narrow. In a linked condition called atherosclerosis, the arteries stiffen up due to a buildup of plaque in the arteries and blood vessels. These two conditions can cause a decrease in the amount of blood that flows to your extremities, therefore resulting in pain.

Symptoms

Some of the most common symptoms of poor circulation are:

  • Numbness
  • Tingling
  • Throbbing or stinging pain in limbs
  • Pain
  • Muscle Cramps

Treatment for poor circulation often depends on the underlying condition that causes it. Methods for treatment may include insulin for diabetes, special exercise programs, surgery for varicose veins, or compression socks for swollen legs.

As always, see a podiatrist as he or she will assist in finding a regimen that suits you. A podiatrist can also prescribe you any needed medication. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Uniontown, and Connellsville, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Causes Symptoms and Treatment for Poor Circulation in the Feet
Sunday, 26 January 2020 00:00

Gout Pain Can Be Managed

Gout is a form of arthritis that can affect anyone. Schedule a visit to learn about how gout can be managed and treated.

Those with peripheral artery disease, or PAD for short, may experience chronic ischemia, better known as a lack of blood supply. When this occurs, you may experience a dull, cramping pain in the affected area, commonly the feet, when exercising. The pain often stops when resting. This kind of symptom is referred to as claudication. For a proper diagnosis, a podiatrist may suggest taking an ABI, or ankle brachial index. This exam consists of using ultrasound images that will measure the blood pressure in your feet. This type of test is common for diagnosing PAD, and is painless. PAD is likely to develop among adults over the age of 50, and is especially common for those with diabetes. For more information about peripheral artery disease, and to discuss a plan for treatment, we recommend you consult with a podiatrist for professional care.

Peripheral artery disease can pose a serious risk to your health. It can increase the risk of stroke and heart attack. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, consult with Dr. Arnold Tarpley, Jr. from Tarpley Foot and Ankle Center. Dr. Tarpley will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is when arteries are constricted due to plaque (fatty deposits) build-up. This results in less blood flow to the legs and other extremities. The main cause of PAD is atherosclerosis, in which plaque builds up in the arteries.

Symptoms

Symptoms of PAD include:

  • Claudication (leg pain from walking)
  • Numbness in legs
  • Decrease in growth of leg hair and toenails
  • Paleness of the skin
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Sores and wounds on legs and feet that won’t heel
  • Coldness in one leg

It is important to note that a majority of individuals never show any symptoms of PAD.

Diagnosis

While PAD occurs in the legs and arteries, Podiatrists can diagnose PAD. Podiatrists utilize a test called an ankle-brachial index (ABI). An ABI test compares blood pressure in your arm to you ankle to see if any abnormality occurs. Ultrasound and imaging devices may also be used.

Treatment

Fortunately, lifestyle changes such as maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, managing cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and quitting smoking, can all treat PAD. Medications that prevent clots from occurring can be prescribed. Finally, in some cases, surgery may be recommended.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Uniontown, and Connellsville, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Peripheral Artery Disease
Monday, 13 January 2020 00:00

How Corns Develop

A corn on the foot may develop as a result of excess friction, and can be uncomfortable. It may develop between the toes, and appears to be a soft growth, often causing difficulty in walking. Additionally, many patients notice they form on top of the toes. This may be common in patients who have hammertoe. Mild relief may be found when the foot is soaked in warm water, as this generally helps to soften the corn. Corn pads can be worn while completing daily activities, and this is beneficial in protecting the affected area against additional friction. If you have corns, and would like advice about how to treat them, it is suggested that you consult with a podiatrist who can help you to manage this condition.

If you have any concerns regarding your feet and ankles, contact Dr. Arnold Tarpley, Jr. of Tarpley Foot and Ankle Center. Dr. Tarpley will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Corns: What Are They? and How Do You Get Rid of Them?
Corns can be described as areas of the skin that have thickened to the point of becoming painful or irritating. They are often layers and layers of the skin that have become dry and rough, and are normally smaller than calluses.

Ways to Prevent Corns
There are many ways to get rid of painful corns such as wearing:

  • Well-fitting socks
  • Comfortable shoes that are not tight around your foot
  • Shoes that offer support

Treating Corns
Treatment of corns involves removing the dead skin that has built up in the specific area of the foot. Consult with Dr. Tarpley to determine the best treatment option for your case of corns.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Uniontown, and Connellsville, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Everything You Need to Know About Corns
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