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Uniontown 
Connellsville 
(724) 320-2447

September 2021

Tuesday, 28 September 2021 00:00

What Can Be Done to Treat an Ankle Sprain?

Ankle sprains can occur when one or more ligaments in the ankle are overstretched or torn, usually due to a sudden, twisting injury of the ankle. Sprains can range from mild to severe, but in all cases, a full recovery is vital to prevent future ankle injuries. For all ankle sprains, it is important to protect the sprained ankle from further injury by resting it. Applying ice, compressing, and elevating the injured ankle can help reduce swelling and inflammation. Taking over-the-counter anti-inflammatory drugs can be useful for pain management. Gentle stretching and strengthening exercises can help during the recovery process as well. Moderate to severe sprains will usually require further treatments to ensure proper healing. These may include footwear modifications, wearing orthotics, going to physical therapy, wearing an ankle brace or support, and in particularly severe cases, undergoing surgery to repair a torn ligament. If you have sprained your ankle, it is suggested that you seek the care of a podiatrist. 

Although ankle sprains are common, they aren’t always minor injuries. If you need your ankle injury looked at, contact Dr. Arnold Tarpley, Jr. from Tarpley Foot and Ankle Center. Dr. Tarpley can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

How Does an Ankle Sprain Occur?

Ankle sprains are the result of a tear in the ligaments within the ankle. These injuries may happen when you make a rapid shifting movement while your foot is planted. A less common way to sprain your ankle is when your ankle rolls inward while your foot turns outward.

What Are the Symptoms?

  • Pain at the sight of the tear
  • Bruising/Swelling
  • Ankle area is tender to touch
  • In severe cases, may hear/feel something tear
  • Skin discoloration

Preventing a Sprain

  • Wearing appropriate shoes for the occasion
  • Stretching before exercises and sports
  • Knowing your limits

Treatment of a Sprain

In many cases, the RICE method (Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevate) is used to treat ankle sprains. However, you should see a podiatrist to see which treatment option would work best with your injury. In severe cases, surgery may be required.

It is important to ask your doctor about rehab options after you receive treatment for your injury. Stretching, strength training, and balance exercises may help the ankle heal while also preventing further injury.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Uniontown, and Connellsville, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 21 September 2021 00:00

Fracture of the Pinky Toe

The pinky toe is the smallest toe on the foot, and it is located on the outside of the foot.  It can easily be involved in an injury and be painful to deal with when broken.  A broken pinky toe will often appear to be bruised, and can turn red and purple. Some patients experience swelling, as well as misalignment of the affected toe. An effective diagnosis may involve undergoing an X-ray, which can help to determine what type of fracture it is. A hairline fracture can be treated by resting the affected foot, and relief may be found when an elastic bandage is worn. Patients who are over sixty-five may be prone to enduring a dislocated toe, meaning separation of the bones in the toe. If you feel you may have broken your toe, it is strongly suggested that you are under the care of a podiatrist who can help you with correct treatment options.

A broken toe can be very painful and lead to complications if not properly fixed. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact Dr. Arnold Tarpley, Jr. from Tarpley Foot and Ankle Center. Dr. Tarpley will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What to Know About a Broken Toe

Although most people try to avoid foot trauma such as banging, stubbing, or dropping heavy objects on their feet, the unfortunate fact is that it is a common occurrence. Given the fact that toes are positioned in front of the feet, they typically sustain the brunt of such trauma. When trauma occurs to a toe, the result can be a painful break (fracture).

Symptoms of a Broken Toe

  • Throbbing pain
  • Swelling
  • Bruising on the skin and toenail
  • The inability to move the toe
  • Toe appears crooked or disfigured
  • Tingling or numbness in the toe

Generally, it is best to stay off of the injured toe with the affected foot elevated.

Severe toe fractures may be treated with a splint, cast, and in some cases, minor surgery. Due to its position and the pressure it endures with daily activity, future complications can occur if the big toe is not properly treated.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Uniontown, and Connellsville, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Friday, 17 September 2021 00:00

Are You Suffering From Ingrown Toenails?

If left untreated, an ingrown toenail can lead to more serious concerns, such as an infection. Knowing proper nail care can help in the prevention of an ingrown toenail. Give us a call, and get treated!

Tuesday, 14 September 2021 00:00

A Toe Stretch for Plantar Fasciitis

The plantar fascia is a ligament that runs along the bottom of the foot, and can be at risk of injury. When it is inflamed, usually due to repetitive overuse from playing sports or working out, plantar fasciitis may develop. Symptoms of this condition can include heel pain, arch pain, and possible swelling and tenderness along the bottom of the foot. There are many foot exercises that you can try to help relieve pain. Stretching is one way to help yourself recover from plantar fasciitis. One such exercise is the toe stretch. To do this exercise, sit on the floor with your knee bent and foot flat on the floor. Pull the toes back until you feel a stretch in the arch of your foot. Hold for 30 seconds, and then relax. Repeat 10 times. For more information about plantar fasciitis and foot stretches, please consult with a podiatrist.

Stretching the feet is a great way to prevent injuries. If you have any concerns with your feet consult with Dr. Arnold Tarpley, Jr. from Tarpley Foot and Ankle Center. Dr. Tarpley will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Stretching the Feet

Stretching the muscles in the foot is an important part in any physical activity. Feet that are tight can lead to less flexibility and make you more prone to injury. One of the most common forms of foot pain, plantar fasciitis, can be stretched out to help ease the pain. Stretching can not only ease pain from plantar fasciitis but also prevent it as well. However, it is important to see a podiatrist first if stretching is right for you. Podiatrists can also recommend other ways to stretch your feet. Once you know whether stretching is right for you, here are some excellent stretches you can do.

  • Using a foam roller or any cylindrical object (a water bottle or soda can will do), roll the object under your foot back and forth. You should also exert pressure on the object. Be sure to do this to both feet for a minute. Do this exercise three times each.
  • Similar to the previous one, take a ball, such as a tennis ball, and roll it under your foot while seated and exert pressure on it.
  • Grab a resistance band or towel and take a seat. If you are using a towel, fold it length wise. Next put either one between the ball of your foot and heel and pull with both hands on each side towards you. Hold this for 15 seconds and then switch feet. Do this three times for each foot.
  • Finally hold your big toe while crossing one leg over the other. Pull the toe towards you and hold for 15 seconds. Once again do this three times per foot.

It is best to go easy when first stretching your foot and work your way up. If your foot starts hurting, stop exercising and ice and rest the foot. It is advised to then see a podiatrist for help.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Uniontown, and Connellsville, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Achilles tendinopathy refers to the inflammation of the Achilles tendon, a thick band of tissue that connects the calf muscles to the heel bone. Symptoms of Achilles tendinopathy include pain in the back of the ankle and heel that worsens with activity, a restricted range of motion, swelling, redness, heat, or a lump in the tendon. People who play sports and those who have flat feet or high arches are at an increased risk of Achilles tendinopathy. While mild injuries can respond well to home treatments like resting, icing, compressing, and elevating the affected leg, more severe injuries will need prompt attention from a medical professional. If you heard a popping or snapping sound before you began to feel pain or have severe pain that doesn’t improve over time, it is suggested that you see a podiatrist as soon as possible for treatment. 

Achilles tendon injuries need immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact Dr. Arnold Tarpley, Jr. of Tarpley Foot and Ankle Center. Dr. Tarpley can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is the Achilles Tendon?

The Achilles tendon is a tendon that connects the lower leg muscles and calf to the heel of the foot. It is the strongest tendon in the human body and is essential for making movement possible. Because this tendon is such an integral part of the body, any injuries to it can create immense difficulties and should immediately be presented to a doctor.

What Are the Symptoms of an Achilles Tendon Injury?

There are various types of injuries that can affect the Achilles tendon. The two most common injuries are Achilles tendinitis and ruptures of the tendon.

Achilles Tendinitis Symptoms

  • Inflammation
  • Dull to severe pain
  • Increased blood flow to the tendon
  • Thickening of the tendon

Rupture Symptoms

  • Extreme pain and swelling in the foot
  • Total immobility

Treatment and Prevention

Achilles tendon injuries are diagnosed by a thorough physical evaluation, which can include an MRI. Treatment involves rest, physical therapy, and in some cases, surgery. However, various preventative measures can be taken to avoid these injuries, such as:

  • Thorough stretching of the tendon before and after exercise
  • Strengthening exercises like calf raises, squats, leg curls, leg extensions, leg raises, lunges, and leg presses

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Uniontown, and Connellsville, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Achilles Tendon Injuries
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