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Uniontown 
Connellsville 
(724) 320-2447

December 2021

Diabetes can affect the flow of blood to the foot and ankles which can cause a variety of serious foot problems. If you are a caretaker for a person with diabetes, it’s critical to take care of their feet to avoid complications, which can worsen and lead to limb loss or worse in severe cases. You’ll need to visually and physically inspect their feet daily, looking for any breaks or pressure points in the skin where a sore may develop. Do not allow the person to walk barefoot, and be careful not to expose their feet to extreme hot or cold temperatures, especially if neuropathy has caused a loss of sensitivity. Their feet should be kept clean and dry, especially between the toes. Toenails should be trimmed straight across and not too short, which could encourage the nail to grow into the skin. If they have a corn, callus or wart, schedule an appointment with a podiatrist for proper treatment. In fact, regular visits with a podiatrist are suggested as part of maintaining the diabetic’s overall foot health.

Diabetic foot care is important in preventing foot ailments such as ulcers. If you are suffering from diabetes or have any other concerns about your feet, contact Dr. Arnold Tarpley, Jr. from Tarpley Foot and Ankle Center. Dr. Tarpley can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Diabetic Foot Care

Diabetes affects millions of people every year. The condition can damage blood vessels in many parts of the body, especially the feet. Because of this, taking care of your feet is essential if you have diabetes, and having a podiatrist help monitor your foot health is highly recommended.

The Importance of Caring for Your Feet

  • Routinely inspect your feet for bruises or sores.
  • Wear socks that fit your feet comfortably.
  • Wear comfortable shoes that provide adequate support.

Patients with diabetes should have their doctor monitor their blood levels, as blood sugar levels play such a huge role in diabetic care. Monitoring these levels on a regular basis is highly advised.

It is always best to inform your healthcare professional of any concerns you may have regarding your feet, especially for diabetic patients. Early treatment and routine foot examinations are keys to maintaining proper health, especially because severe complications can arise if proper treatment is not applied.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Uniontown, and Connellsville, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Diabetic Foot Conditions

Sever’s disease is a common cause of heel pain in youth who are in their growth spurt between the ages of 8 and 14. Sever’s disease is caused when the Achilles tendon, which connects the calf muscle to the heel, doesn’t grow as fast as the bones in the calves. This causes the tendon to pull up on the heel, resulting in pain. Symptoms of Sever’s disease include heel pain when or after exercising, limping, and tiptoeing. While Sever’s disease often gets better over time, there are treatment options for the pain such as ice, load management, medicine or even orthotics. Because of this, if your child is complaining of heel pain that may be Sever’s disease, it would be wise to consult with a podiatrist.

Sever's disease often occurs in children and teens. If your child is experiencing foot or ankle pain, see Dr. Arnold Tarpley, Jr. from Tarpley Foot and Ankle Center. Dr. Tarpley can treat your child’s foot and ankle needs.

Sever’s Disease

Sever’s disease is also known as calcaneal apophysitis, which is a medical condition that causes heel pain I none or both feet. The disease is known to affect children between the ages of 8 and 14.

Sever’s disease occurs when part of the child’s heel known as the growth plate (calcaneal epiphysis) is attached to the Achilles tendon. This area can suffer injury when the muscles and tendons of the growing foot do not keep pace with bone growth. Therefore, the constant pain which one experiences at the back of the heel will make the child unable to put any weight on the heel. The child is then forced to walk on their toes.

Symptoms

Acute pain – Pain associated with Sever’s disease is usually felt in the heel when the child engages in physical activity such as walking, jumping and or running.

Highly active – Children who are very active are among the most susceptible in experiencing Sever’s disease, because of the stress and tension placed on their feet.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Uniontown, and Connellsville, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle injuries.

Read more about Sever's Disease
Thursday, 16 December 2021 00:00

Arthritis Can Cause Pain in the Feet and Ankles

If you are suffering from tenderness, pain, or stiffness in the joints of your feet or ankles, call us to schedule an appointment.

Tuesday, 14 December 2021 00:00

Making Sense of Plantar Fasciitis

The fascia is a long, fibrous band of tissue that connects the ball of the foot with the heel bone. When that tissue becomes injured or damaged it can tear, and become inflamed and painful. This is a condition known as plantar fasciitis. There are many reasons why plantar fasciitis can occur, including wearing shoes that don’t provide adequate support, having a job that requires you to stand all day, and being obese, old, or very physically active. Certain structural anomalies, like high arches and flat feet, or alignment/gait issues can also contribute to plantar fasciitis developing. A telltale sign of plantar fasciitis is pain that is intense when you first wake up, and then gets gradually better as the day progresses. Since plantar fasciitis is the most common form of heel pain, podiatrists have a great deal of experience treating this condition. They may use rest, ice, physical therapy, night splints, and orthotics to treat it. If these protocols don’t yield optimum results, the podiatrist may use extracorporeal shock wave therapy to heal pain and boost the body’s natural healing process to repair the damaged plantar fascia. If you believe you may have plantar fasciitis, it is suggested that you see a podiatrist for an accurate diagnosis and expert treatment.

Plantar fasciitis is a common foot condition that is often caused by a strain injury. If you are experiencing heel pain or symptoms of plantar fasciitis, contact Dr. Arnold Tarpley, Jr. from Tarpley Foot and Ankle Center. Dr. Tarpley can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common causes of heel pain. The plantar fascia is a ligament that connects your heel to the front of your foot. When this ligament becomes inflamed, plantar fasciitis is the result. If you have plantar fasciitis you will have a stabbing pain that usually occurs with your first steps in the morning. As the day progresses and you walk around more, this pain will start to disappear, but it will return after long periods of standing or sitting.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

  • Excessive running
  • Having high arches in your feet
  • Other foot issues such as flat feet
  • Pregnancy (due to the sudden weight gain)
  • Being on your feet very often

There are some risk factors that may make you more likely to develop plantar fasciitis compared to others. The condition most commonly affects adults between the ages of 40 and 60. It also tends to affect people who are obese because the extra pounds result in extra stress being placed on the plantar fascia.

Prevention

  • Take good care of your feet – Wear shoes that have good arch support and heel cushioning.
  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • If you are a runner, alternate running with other sports that won’t cause heel pain

There are a variety of treatment options available for plantar fasciitis along with the pain that accompanies it. Additionally, physical therapy is a very important component in the treatment process. It is important that you meet with your podiatrist to determine which treatment option is best for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Uniontown, and Connellsville, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

Read more about Plantar Fasciitis
Tuesday, 07 December 2021 00:00

Dealing With an Athlete’s Foot Infection

Athlete’s foot is a fungal infection that causes itching and sometimes painful sores or flaking skin, most commonly between the toes. While there are a number of topical remedies to treat Athlete’s foot at home, they are not always foolproof. This fungus is highly contagious and can be transferred to another person, as well as yourself, by direct contact. It is commonly spread in public shower areas and changing rooms. The best way to reduce or eliminate Athlete’s foot is to keep your feet and toes clean. Pat the affected areas dry, rather than rubbing them. Use a separate towel for the feet to reduce the chances of spreading the infection to other body parts. Apply non-prescription sprays, creams and powders as directed, and wear cotton socks to absorb moisture that is a fungal breeding ground. Further, avoid wearing the same pair of shoes more than two days in a row. If the treatment doesn’t work, or if you have diabetes or a weakened immune system, please don’t hesitate to seek the advice of a podiatrist for advanced treatment. 

Athlete’s Foot

Athlete’s foot is often an uncomfortable condition to experience. Thankfully, podiatrists specialize in treating athlete’s foot and offer the best treatment options. If you have any questions about athlete’s foot, consult with Dr. Arnold Tarpley, Jr. from Tarpley Foot and Ankle Center. Dr. Tarpley will assess your condition and provide you with quality treatment.

What Is Athlete’s Foot?

Tinea pedis, more commonly known as athlete’s foot, is a non-serious and common fungal infection of the foot. Athlete’s foot is contagious and can be contracted by touching someone who has it or infected surfaces. The most common places contaminated by it are public showers, locker rooms, and swimming pools. Once contracted, it grows on feet that are left inside moist, dark, and warm shoes and socks.

Prevention

The most effective ways to prevent athlete’s foot include:

  • Thoroughly washing and drying feet
  • Avoid going barefoot in locker rooms and public showers
  • Using shower shoes in public showers
  • Wearing socks that allow the feet to breathe
  • Changing socks and shoes frequently if you sweat a lot

Symptoms

Athlete’s foot initially occurs as a rash between the toes. However, if left undiagnosed, it can spread to the sides and bottom of the feet, toenails, and if touched by hand, the hands themselves. Symptoms include:

  • Redness
  • Burning
  • Itching
  • Scaly and peeling skin

Diagnosis and Treatment

Diagnosis is quick and easy. Skin samples will be taken and either viewed under a microscope or sent to a lab for testing. Sometimes, a podiatrist can diagnose it based on simply looking at it. Once confirmed, treatment options include oral and topical antifungal medications.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Uniontown, and Connellsville, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

Read more about Athlete's Foot
Thursday, 02 December 2021 00:00

What Podiatrist Do to Help Treat Flat Feet

Some babies are born with flat feet and as they grow, the tendons in their feet tighten and formulate arches, typically by the time they reach 2 or 3 years of age. If arches never develop in babies feet, or they present only when they are sitting or on their toes, this is known as rigid flatfoot or flexible flatfoot, respectively. Flatfoot may be asymptomatic, or produce symptoms such as pain on the outside of the ankle, or achy, tired feet after playing sports or standing for extended periods of time. Calf muscles may also be tight, and there can be problems walking, standing, or balancing. If you are experiencing symptoms like these, contact a podiatrist to be diagnosed and treated properly. To determine if your condition is rigid or flexible, the podiatrist may ask you to stand on your toes. If your arch becomes visible while standing on your toes and collapses when you place your foot on the floor, you may be afflicted with flexible flatfoot. If your arch never presents (even while on your toes), the podiatrist may order a CT scan, MRI, or X-ray to make a diagnosis of rigid flatfoot. Your podiatrist may prescribe custom orthotics or special shoes to provide arch support and relieve pain, and/or calf muscle stretches to help improve ankle range of motion (dorsiflexion). If these more conservative techniques do not offer relief, surgery may be necessary to relieve pain, repair tendons, and restore the arch.

Flatfoot is a condition many people suffer from. If you have flat feet, contact Dr. Arnold Tarpley, Jr. from Tarpley Foot and Ankle Center. Dr. Tarpley will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What Are Flat Feet?

Flatfoot is a condition in which the arch of the foot is depressed and the sole of the foot is almost completely in contact with the ground. About 20-30% of the population generally has flat feet because their arches never formed during growth.

Conditions & Problems:

Having flat feet makes it difficult to run or walk because of the stress placed on the ankles.

Alignment – The general alignment of your legs can be disrupted, because the ankles move inward which can cause major discomfort.

Knees – If you have complications with your knees, flat feet can be a contributor to arthritis in that area.  

Symptoms

  • Pain around the heel or arch area
  • Trouble standing on the tip toe
  • Swelling around the inside of the ankle
  • Flat look to one or both feet
  • Having your shoes feel uneven when worn

Treatment

If you are experiencing pain and stress on the foot you may weaken the posterior tibial tendon, which runs around the inside of the ankle. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Uniontown, and Connellsville, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Flat Feet
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